• War Games

    V&A Museum of Childhood, London

    • Date:
    • 2013
    • Client:
    • V&A

    War Games
    V&A Museum of Childhood, London

    Working with curators at the V&A Museum of Childhood we designed a national touring exhibition entitled War Games,
    a show for adults and young children exploring the role of warfare in children’s play from 1800 to the present day.

    Why do children play war games? The exhibition provided an opportunity for visitors to investigate how toys recreate and represent war, and to ask them to question this often controversial subject.

    Showcasing over 100 objects, the exhibition examined the effect of war and conflict on toys and games through four thematic sections: Playing at War, On the Battlefield, Reality to Fantasy and Secret Weapons. The displays were highly interactive, encouraging children to dress up, play at espionage and engage in many other activities that breakencourage learning, while photography, film and games all contributed to a diverse and stimulating experience.

  • Sit Down

    V&A Museum of Childhood, London

    • Date:
    • 2010
    • Client:
    • V&A

    Sit Down
    V&A Museum of Childhood, London

    Sit Down, was an exhibition designed for the V&A Museum of Childhood in London which then toured the country, looking at how children’s chair design has evolved, most noticably during the 20th century.

    It featured more than 70 types of seating, from rocking horses to stern deportment chairs as well as designs from Charles Eames, Vitra and El Ultimo Grito, and even a Modernist high chair by Dutch architect, Gerrit Rietveld.

    The exhibition design followed the narrative of the Three Bears. Visitors entered the show through small, medium or large doors that lead into a “bear’s cottage” where they could eventually vote for their favourite chair using spoons in porridge bowls displayed on an interactive dinner table.break

    The exhibition concluded with a timeline of children’s seating from 1600 to contemporary recycled chairs, and visitors could also make their own Ercol chair (an Ercol chair ‘arch’ was on display in the main entrance to the Museum).